Musings on “Space Opera”

If you’re American, Eurovision is probably one of those things that you either get or you don’t. An international song competition, it’s absurd to the max and not one of those things you can easily explain because it must be experienced. Personally, I only have fond feelings towards Eurovision and can’t really decide whether I like the performances or the voting part better. (We made a friend watch one year and I think he has slightly less than fond feelings about it although he at least sort of liked the voting.) The competition may get a little heated sometimes but it’s really just a giant disco ball of happiness and we could all use a little of that in our lives.

Point is, all anyone ever had to do to sell me on Catherynne Valente’s Space Opera was say that it’s Eurovision but in space. Sign me the hell up. Very much in the vein of Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Space Opera doesn’t take itself too seriously and instead revels in the Eurovision—sorry, Metagalactic Grand Prix—ridiculousness for a enjoyable ride. That’s not to say that the book is all fun and games. After all, the contestants do try and kill each other before the semi final and it’s only Decible Jones and the Absolute Zero since the other Absolute Zero died in a tragic car accident years ago and her death still hangs over them. This isn’t the sort of inspiring story where the human race crushes the Metagalactic competition to pieces and reigns victorious. However, this is the sort of story where you close the book and go, “Huh. Well if there’s Eurovision in space and we’re suddenly invited to join in one day, that might actually be how it goes.” (And now that I’m writing that… oh God we’re doomed.)

Space Opera is flashy and entertaining but also doesn’t let the glitz stop it from saying a thing or two about mankind without feeling like a life lesson. I keep coming back to the word absurd as I think about this book but I meant it in the best possible way. I can’t wait to see how it eventually translates to the big screen partially due to the amazing descriptions of some of the previous Metagalactic acts. (How can you not want to see an industrial sea-shanty called “You Bombard My Heart with Overwhelming Air Superiority” or a neo-gangsta math-rock anthem titled, “This Program Has Executed An Error And Must Shut Down”?) Space Opera lets us escape to a much larger and stranger galaxy and enjoy the glam as humans try and save themselves with a song.

In space, everyone can hear you sing.

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Review: The Memory of Fire

In the sequel to her pretty awesome debut novel, Callie Bates takes us back to that same world but adds a twist: this time we’re headed to the Imperial Court in Paladis and instead of staying with Elanna, we get to know her lover Jahan a little better as he returns the court in hopes of persuading the Emperor and Crown Prince to treat with Eren’s new Queen Sophy instead of starting a war. But things have changed since Jahan left Paladis and he may not longer have the status and influence he once enjoyed. Oh and those witch hunters? Yeah, they’re definitely going to be a problem. Continue reading

Review: The Legends of Luke Skywalker

Luke Skywalker… I thought he was a myth.

Probably every review you read of The Legends of Luke Skywalker by Ken Liu will incorporate this line from The Force Awakens but when it’s apt, it’s apt. Liu uses this line as a springboard to tell a delightful collection of tales about the fabled Jedi Knight that are true… from their points of view. It’s a book that’s going to give the “BUT IS IT CANON?” crowd heartburn but will likely delight the rest of us who are okay with sitting back and enjoying the ride.

There are six stories within the book, all told to a group of young deckhands on a cargo ship bound for Canto Bight. My favorite might be the one in which Luke isn’t actually a noble Jedi Knight but rather a very talented con artist along with Han, Chewie, and Obi-Wan. One must respect the con abilities of Luke Plodhopper. The cherry on top of the tale is that Luke is secretly present for the telling and just quietly encourages the storyteller and never contradicts the narrative. He doesn’t feel the need for the entire galaxy to believe that he’s a hero. Policing people’s thoughts were the act of the Empire and he didn’t fight a war to continue that.

For a book about Luke Skywalker that never once gives us his point of view, Ken Liu does an incredible job of really getting the character in a way that has felt rare. Honestly, we’re very lucky to get this book and his mission in Battlefront II within mere weeks of each other. They’re very different stories and mediums but both get why so many people have loved Luke for decades. Even through the eyes of others, Liu makes it clear that he understands what sort of person Luke is and his relationship with the Force.

Much like with From a Certain Point of View, there’s a story here for everyone even if all of the stories likely won’t click on the same levels. Liu makes it a point to vary the tone and voices of the stories which not only makes sense given that different people are telling them but also keeps it interesting. A droid shouldn’t sound the same as a bug sized alien who in turn shouldn’t sound the same as a young woman who spends her time flying and trusts in the Tide.

Most importantly though, The Legends of Luke Skywalker adds to the mythos of Luke within the galaxy far, far way. He’s a hero in both of our galaxies but he’s also transcended being viewed as a historical figure within a relatively short time frame. It’s no wonder the Jedi also faded so quickly into a forgotten, mythological status. While these might not be “canon,” reliable narrator stories, they do still help expand the galaxy and let us understand it a little better.

If you’re looking for something to read, The Legends of Luke Skywalker is an excellent choice both for you and for the younger readers in your life that I would absolutely recommend.

Thank you to Disney/Lucasfilm Press for providing a copy of the book for review purposes.

Review: The Waking Land

When a book has words of praise on the cover from Tamora Pierce, that’s about all the encouragement I need to give that novel a try. Thankfully, The Waking Land by Callie Bates did not disappoint. It’s a solidly enjoyable (albeit not perfect) tale about a young woman who’s been a pawn all of her life and now has to figure who she is and what she wants in the midst of a revolutionary war. Continue reading

Review: Defy the Stars

Claudia Gray takes us back to the stars except this time, they’re a little bit closer and in our future instead of a long time ago and in a galaxy far, far away. “Defy the Stars” is the story of Noemi Vidal, a teenage soldier who’s preparing to embark on a suicide mission that could save her people, and Abel, a one-of-a-kind mech prototype who’s been stranded alone aboard a ship for decades. Thrown together by chance, the pair embark on an adventure that takes them across the galaxy as Noemi tries to get home in time for her mission and Abel’s programming leaves him with no choice but to help her… until it’s more than just programming that keeps him on her side.

“Defy the Stars” takes our world, leaps forward several centuries in the future, and wonders where we might be once we live on planets aside from Earth. It considers what life for us could be like one day. It ponders what you might do when what you thought was right is upended. And it questions what it means to be human, to be alive, and to have a soul. There’s a bit of a love story, yes, but it’s done so subtly and builds upon the growing trust and friendship between the two characters that the reader, like Abel and Noemi, might not quite realize where it’s leading until they do. “Defy the Stars” manages to be both a very personal story about very likable main characters and a larger story about the galaxy as a whole. Continue reading

Review: Lords of the Sith

This review was originally posted to Tumblr on April 27, 2015

Lords of the Sith by Paul S. Kemp has the distinction of being both a book that’s what it says on the label and of also being filled with unexpected surprises. Out today in bookstores everywhere, Lords of the Sith successfully gives you your fix of Vader and Palpatine being ruthlessly effective when it comes to taking care of business while telling all sides of the story.

Vader getting a story in which he gets to be the badass supreme can often be impressive enough but when you add in Palpatine also getting his hands dirty?  You know it’s going down.  Part of what makes the Emperor such an effective character is how rarely he actually dives in to the fray himself.  Readers and watchers know that someone’s going to die the minute the lightsaber (or the Force lightning) come out.  Not many people have lived to see this brutal efficiency and for good reason.

Continue reading